Language and Composition – College Credit Course

$75.00

This course covers a basic overview of grammar, essay analysis, and writing. This is a graded course, each student will receive a course transcript that reflects a final grade based on 11 module quizzes, 11 module evidence activities, a mid-term exam and a final exam.

To be eligible for transferable college credit for this course, TEL Library must be able to verify your identity via a government issued photo ID. You will need an ID to complete the proctored mid-term and final examinations, as well as apply for a transcript. You can being your studies in this course while obtaining the appropriate identification, but you must have the government issued photo ID prior to scheduling the mid-term exam.

Check our our Certification Course if you do not need transferable college credit.

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Welcome to Language and Composition

This course is a study of the basics of composition including types of essays, how to analyze essay writing, and how to prewrite and edit your essays. The course also includes a description and understanding of rhetoric, argumentation, persuasion, and the rhetorical situation as it applies to past and current writing.

This is a self-paced online course. It contains 11 modules, each with multiple lessons that support varied approaches to help a student learn and engage with the topic, including readings, video, and a knowledge-check quiz.

This is a graded course, each student will receive a course transcript that reflects a final grade based on 11 module quizzes,11 module evidence activities, a mid-term exam and a final exam.

Two online proctored examinations, the mid-term and final, are included in the cost of the course.

Course Outcomes

This course focuses on the following learning outcomes. By the end of the course you will be able to:

  • Analyze and interpret the function essays of different genres.
  • Implement composition basics of prewriting, drafts, and editing to construct an essay.
  • Create original essays based on the function and purpose of different essay genres.
  • Evaluate and apply composition basics of editing, ethics, documentation, and citations to original essays.
  • Apply the elements of the Rhetorical situation to essay analysis and original writing.
  • Evaluate and explain elements of argumentation and persuasion as they apply to writing and rhetorical situations.

Technology Requirements

This course is delivered fully online and you will be required to have access to a computer, laptop, or web-capable mobile device – along with consistent access to the internet – to access course material and complete assignments.

Review the information below to ensure your system meets the minimum requirements necessary to complete a course for credit.  

PC Requirements

Hardware

  • Intel Core 2 Duo (or AMD 64×2 Dual-Core) processor
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 80 GB hard drive
  • 1024×768 resolution monitor
  • Soundcard with microphone and speakers
  • Built-in or external webcam
  • Broadband internet connection with speeds of  at least 2 Mbps download and 2 Mbps upload. Hot spots are not recommended. Test internet speed at: http://www.speedtest.net
  • Browser with pop-up blocker disabled

Software

  • Windows 7 or above

Macintosh Requirements

Hardware

  • Intel Core 2 Duo (or AMD 64×2 Dual-Core) processor
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 80 GB hard drive
  • 1024×768 resolution monitor
  • Soundcard with microphone and speakers
  • Built-in or external webcam
  • Broadband internet connection with speeds of  at least 2 Mbps download and 2 Mbps upload. Hot spots are not recommended. Test internet speed at: http://www.speedtest.net
  • Browser with pop-up blocker disabled

Software

  • Mac OS 10.6 “Snow Leopard” or above

Tablet or Smartphone

NOTICE:  Though you can view and interact with all of the available course content on a tablet or smartphone, you MUST USE A DESKTOP OR LAPTOP computer to complete the proctored midterm and final examinations.

Hardware

  • 2 GHz process or faster
  • 1 GB RAM or greater
  • 80 GB hard drive
  • Microphone and speakers
  • Wireless internet connection

Course Outline

Module 1 – The History and Design of the Essay

The History of the Essay

  • What is an essay?
  • Why do we write essays?
  • What is academic or formal writing?

Essay Elements and Types of Essays

  • What is the function of an essay?
  • What are the elements of an essay?
  • What are common types of essays?
  • How do different fields of study use essay writing?

Susan B. Anthony: “On Women’s Right to Vote”

  • Susan B. Anthony
  • The women’s suffrage movement
  • Read “One Woman’s Right to Vote.”

Louisa May Alcott: “Death of a Soldier”

  • Louisa May Alcott
  • The role of women in the Civil War
  • Read “Death of a Soldier.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson: “Self Reliance”

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • What is transcendentalism?
  • Read “Self-Reliance.”

Module 2 – The Rhetorical Situation: Purpose, Audience, Speaker

Effective Writing and the Rhetorical Situation

  • The Basic Elements of Effective Writing: Writer, Message, and Reader
  • Rhetoric and the Rhetorical Situation
  • The Six Components of the Rhetorical Situation

Writing for an Audience

  • Identifying Audience
  • Audience Level
  • Audience Background
  • Audience Values and Beliefs

Essay Writer as Speaker

  • Credibility/Expertise
  • Language
  • Personality/Voice

Essay Analysis: Frederick Douglass: “The Destiny of Colored Americans”

  • Frederick Douglass
  • Slavery and Emancipation in the U.S.
  • Frederick Douglass’ purpose and audience
  • Frederick Douglass’ credibility and how he presents himself

Module 3 – Composition Basics: Prewriting

Brainstorming

  • The goal of prewriting
  • Brainstorming
  • Clustering
  • Freewriting
  • Using prompts and constraints to kickstart prewriting

Clustering Ideas

  • Clustering
  • Mapping
  • Group Clustering

Freewriting

  • The goal of freewriting
  • Freewriting as process
  • Focused freewriting

Creating an Outline

  • The benefits of outlines
  • Formatting an outline to capture an essay’s structure
  • Categorizing subtopics
  • Organizing an essay
  • Descriptive outlines

Module 4 – Composition Basics: Paragraphs and Drafting

Writing a Clear Opening

  • Writing for relevance
  • Writing for clarity
  • Writing for your intended audience
  • Writing to engage interest
  • Communicating a clear plan to your reader

Thesis Statements

  • Identifying the purpose or argument of an essay
  • The types of thesis statements
  • Developing a thesis statement
  • Revising a thesis statement

Body Paragraphs

  • The purpose of body paragraphs
  • Structuring an effective body paragraph
  • Ordering body paragraphs within an essay

Developing an Idea

  • Methods for developing an idea
  • Strategies for evaluating and analyzing your thoughts
  • Anticipating questions and counter-arguments
  • Researching other viewpoints
  • Adding support for your idea

Building an Effective Conclusion

  • Rephrasing the main idea and supporting thoughts
  • Re-establishing relevance
  • Encouraging reader reflection

Essay Analysis: Edgar Allan Poe “The Philosophy of Furniture”

  • Edgar Allen Poe
  • Read “The Philosophy of Furniture”

Module 5 – Narrative and Descriptive Essays

Narrative and Descriptive Essays: Purpose and Organization

  • Define narrative and descriptive essays
  • Basic elements employed in narrative and descriptive essays
  • Organizational strategies for narrative and descriptive writing
  • The Rhetorical Situation for narrative and descriptive writing

Narrative and Descriptive Essays: Technique, Topic, and Style

  • Review definition and basic elements of narrative and descriptive essays
  • Principles of narration
  • Principles of description
  • Choosing a narrative or descriptive topic
  • Review a sample outline

Narrative and Descriptive Essays: Reading Samples

  • Reading strategies for narrative and descriptive essays
  • Read “A South African Storm”

Narrative and Descriptive Essays: Writing Your Own

  • Developing Ideas for Narrative/Descriptive Writing
  • Refining Purpose in Narrative/Descriptive Writing
  • Writing a Thesis for a Narrative/Descriptive Essay
  • Drafting a Narrative/Descriptive Essay
  • Revising a Narrative/Descriptive Essay

Revising for Higher Order Concerns

  • What are high-order concerns?
  • Checking the thesis and focus
  • Reading for audience and purpose
  • Reviewing organization
  • Evaluating an essay’s development

Editing for Lower Order Concerns

  • Editing for grammar
  • Editing for mechanics
  • Editing for sentence structure
  • Editing for style

Module 6 – Classification and Definition Essays

Classification and Definition Essays: Purpose and Organization

  • Purpose of Definition/Classification Writing
  • Basic elements employed in classification and definition essays
  • Organizational strategies for classification and definition writing
  • The Rhetorical Situation for classification and definition writing

Classification and Definition Essays: Technique, Topic, and Style

  • Choosing a classification or definition topic.
  • Choosing the right word/concept for definition essays
  • Developing a thesis that supports your claim

Classification and Definition Essays: Reading Samples

  • Rhetorically reading a classification essay
  • Fred Mednick’s “Multiple Intelligences”

Classification and Definition Essays: Writing Your Own

  • Planning a classification or definition essay
  • Outlining and drafting a classification or definition essay
  • Revising a classification or definition essay
  • Editing a classification or definition essay

Module 7 – Compare and Contrast Essays

Compare and Contrast Essays: Purpose and Organization

  • Defining compare and contrast essays
  • Basic writing elements used in compare and contrast essays
  • Presentation and organizational strategies for compare and contrast writing
  • The Rhetorical Situation for compare and contrast writing

Compare and Contrast Essays: Technique, Topic, and Style

  • Discovering similarities and differences between two or more things
  • Types of comparison
  • Choosing a topic for compare and contrast essays

Compare and Contrast Essays: Reading Samples

  • Reading strategies for compare and contrast essays
  • Read “Nature vs. Nurture, Then and Now”

Compare and Contrast Essays: Writing Your Own

  • Planning a compare and contrast essay
  • Outlining and drafting a compare and contrast essay
  • Revising a compare and contrast essay
  • Editing a compare and contrast essay

Module 8 – Cause and Effect Essays

Cause and Effect Essays: Purpose and Organization

  • Defining cause and effect essays
  • Writing strategies for cause and effect essays
  • Presentation and organizational strategies for cause and effect writing
  • The Rhetorical Situation for cause and effect writing

Cause and Effect Essays: Technique, Topic, and Style

  • Causes and effects Evidence and reasoning
  • Organizational strategies for cause and effect writing
  • Choosing a cause and effect topic

Cause and Effect Essays: Reading Samples

  • Reading strategies for cause and effect writing
  • Read “Body Ritual among the Nacirema”

Cause and Effect Essays: Writing Your Own

  • Planning a cause and effect essay
  • Choosing a topic for a cause and effect essay
  • Revising a cause and effect essay
  • Editing a cause and effect essay

Module 9 – Argumentation and Persuasion

Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

  • Two ways of understanding: inductive and deductive
  • The power of inductive reasoning
  • The power of deductive reasoning Evaluating the truth of a premise

Making Arguments

  • What is an argument?
  • Common types of arguments
  • Making and supporting claims
  • Using appropriate appeals

Responding to Arguments

  • Engaging the opposition in dialogue
  • Refutation and rebuttal
  • Making counter-arguments

Logical Fallacies

  • Types of logical fallacies
  • Finding logical fallacies in writing

Module 10 – Writing Papers and Essays with Documentation

Academic Integrity and Ethical Writing Practices

  • Academic integrity
  • Defining plagiarism
  • Avoiding plagiarism
  • The importance of citing your sources
  • Tips for avoiding academic dishonesty

Finding and Using Evidence Effectively

  • The research process
  • Finding sources
  • Evaluating sources
  • Advanced search strategies
  • Understanding primary, secondary, and tertiary sources

Summarizing, Paraphrasing, and Quoting

  • Summarizing
  • Quoting and paraphrasing

Using MLA Format to Create In-Text Citations and Works Cited Page for Your Sources

  • MLA Formatting
  • The importance of citation
  • Creating a works-cited page
  • Creating in-text citations

Writing Your Paper with Documentation

  • Planning a research essay
  • Outlining and drafting a research essay
  • Revising a research essay
  • Editing a research essay

Module 11 – Argumentative Essays

Argumentative Essays: Purpose and Organization

  • Defining argumentative essay
  • Basic writing strategies for argumentative essays
  • Preparation and organizational strategies for argumentative writing
  • The Rhetorical Situation for argumentative writing

Argumentative Essays: Technique, Topic, and Style

  • Choosing a topic and a side to defend
  • Gathering evidence for an essay
  • Developing your argument and responding to counter-arguments
  • Structuring your essay
  • Read a sample outline

Argumentative Essays: Reading Samples

  • Reading strategies for argumentative essays
  • Read “A Message to Garcia”

Argumentative Essays: Writing Your Own

  • Planning an argumentative essay
  • Outlining and drafting an argumentative essay
  • Revising an argumentative essay
  • Editing an argumentative essay

 

 

 

To be eligible for transferable college credit for this course, TEL Library must be able to verify your identity via a government issued photo ID.  You will need an ID to complete the proctored mid-term and final examinations, as well as apply for a transcript.  You can being your studies in this course while obtaining the appropriate identification, but you must have the government issued photo ID prior to scheduling the mid-term exam.

Complete these steps before you begin your first TEL Library course.

Create a TEL Library account (if you don’t already have one).

  1. Register for an account at TEL Library Courses
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Select your courses.

  1. Determine which courses are right for you since most TEL Library courses are offered via 3 different methods.
    • College Credit Courses:  These courses are traditional graded courses that can be transfered for college credit.  Students will earn a grade that will be on their official TEL Library transcript. These courses require that students have a photo ID to complete the mid-term, final and obtain a transcript.  Please note, you do not need to purchase a textbook in addition to the course.
      The grade for these courses is based upon:

      • Participation and completion of each lesson = 10% of the final grade
      • Graded module quizzes = 15% of the final grade
      • Graded module evidence activities = 25% of the final grade
      • Graded proctored mid-term examination = 25% of the final grade
      • Graded proctored final examination = 25% of the final grade
    • Certificate Courses:  These courses contain all of the same learning content as the College Credit Courses, but do not require the completion of evidence activities, and midterm and final examinations. The outcome for participants is a TEL library Certificate of Completion and publicly sharable Badge. Please note, you do not need to purchase a textbook in addition to the course.
      To be eligible for full course completion, participants must

      • Complete each lesson, including the Check Your Knowledge activity.
      • Obtain a grade of 80% or higher on the module quizzes.  Each participant is given 3 attempts to reach this grade.

      Participants will not be required to complete or have access to evidence activities, mid-term or final examinations.

    • Textbooks: TEL Library Textbooks contain all of the same learning content of the College Credit Courses, but do not include any formal assessment activities.  Purchasers can complete the lesson activities, but no points, grade or certifications will be tracked or awarded.

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